Aging

All people age by slowly accumulating changes over time. Aging is multidimensional process encompassing all aspects of one’s life: physical, spiritual, social, psychological, and mental. Some dimensions of aging grow and expand over time, while others decline. Reaction time often slows down with aging, while knowledge and wisdom expand. Research shows that even late in life, potential exists for physical, mental, and social growth and development.

While the western medical model has excelled in managing many aging complications such as acute fractures, chronic age-related conditions are often managed poorly. At the Center, we believe that regardless of the nature of one’s  aging-related illnesses, there is always room for  improvement of health and wellbeing.

If you are looking for a holistic geriatrician who will  address your medical problems and, most importantly, optimize your current health, you came to the right place.

Dr. Mikhail Kogan is trained in both geriatrics and integrative medicine. He provides comprehensive integrative geriatric consultations as well as geriatric primary care.

What aging-related problems do we address?

  •      Chronic Memory and Cognitive problems

Despite a lack of clear scientific evidence that nutritional deficiencies, chronic stress, and chronic inflammation can lead to cognitive problems and memory loss, we have learned over the years that all these factors frequently contribute to those conditions as we age. To give just one example: Vitamin B12 deficiency is very common in  people over 65 years of age, and not infrequently this deficiency is missed on regular blood tests. We have developed a unique approach of delivering high doses of intramuscular, IV, or intranasal vitamin B12. We utilize alternative functional testing to establish individual needs for this critical nutrient, and thus we are able to provide the optimal amount. This simple intervention frequently provides evident improvement in cognitive function.

We carefully assess frequent links between chronic inflammation and gastrointestinal problems and address it by modifying the diet and prescribing supplements such as probiotics, fish oil, etc.

We also address critical mind-body links by utilizing a variety of services at the Center. For patients on a limited budget, we have developed inexpensive ways to learn effective mind-body methods.

  •     Healthy Aging Program

Offers to optimize hormone balance and minimize the impact of hormonal instability and change; maintain a healthy heart and strong bones; achieve mental, emotional, spiritual and physical health.

  •     Parkinson’s Disease

We utilize several pioneering  methods that we found to be very effective.

  1. IV or Intranasal Glutathione 
  2. Neurotransmitters balancing
  3. Unique body work approach based on osteopathic principles (assessed and treated by Dr Kogan)
  4. Acupuncture to help with Parkinson related symptoms based on historical evidence accumulated by Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners, click here  (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18404373)
  • Depression and anxiety in older people
  • Psychological support, consultations and programs
  • Neurotransmitters balancing  based on careful history and functional testing
  • Chronic digestive problems
  • Chronic joint problems

We work closely with several institutions that are striving to develop innovative care strategies for healthy aging:

 George Washington University, The Center on Aging, Health & Humanities (http://www.gwumc.edu/cahh/index.html)

The Center, founded in 1994 by the late Gene D. Cohen, MD, is the interprofessional home for faculty across departments and schools at the George Washington University who are working to improve the lives and health of older persons through education, research, and work in clinical arenas, with the inclusion of the humanities and creative arts to promote healing and wellness throughout the life span. The Center provides a home for networking and showcasing each faculty member’s and researcher’s individual work to build upon common areas of inquiry and develop the capacity for interprofessional collaboration with colleagues who integrate the humanities and healthcare to improve the quality of life for older adults at GW, in the U.S., and globally. To learn more about the GW Center on Aging, Health and Humanities, click here.

The George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health   (http://www.gwish.org).

GWish was established in May 2001 as a leading organization on education and clinical issues related to spirituality and health. Under the direction of Founder and Director Christina M. Puchalski, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Health Care Sciences, GWish is changing the face of healthcare through innovative programs for physicians and other members of the multidisciplinary healthcare team, including clergy and chaplains.

The George Washington University Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Care (http://www.gwdocs.com/geriatrics)

The life expectancy in the United States has improved so much that the fastest growing population group in the U.S. is over the age of 85. Our board-certified geriatric specialists at the GW Medical Faculty Associates provide comprehensive care for medically complex patients. The services include primary and preventative healthcare, medical and cognitive assessment, management of acute and chronic health problems and memory disorders, and palliative medicine consultation. Our geriatric specialists offer a whole-team approach to patient care, which includes support from a social worker.

Our Medical Director, Dr. Kogan, serves as a faculty member  at each of the above institutions.